character

Making a Character

Fuchs_1stCharacter This is a character I created this weekend.  She is a futuristic space pirate named Brenda.  Her background is that she grew up as a colonial kid on a farm of a far away moon.  She earned her burn scars when she was young by playing too close to a supplies drop-off zone.  She grew up quite resentful of what she considered her home and everyone in it.  At 14 years of age she stole one of the drop off ships and flew it to Earth, the stories of which she had idealized.  The planet, however, was different than she had expected and she found herself unable to fit in with the bustle of the cities.  Feeling cheated and like she had no where to go she began stealing larger space vessels and became a rogue.

Honestly, she does not have a very likable personality.  She is self-centered and selfish.  Her mindset is that the universe and everyone in it are trying to do her wrong.  She is unable to relate to most people, and although she steals she has little value for material goods.  She steals because in her eyes all people are against her and she wants to bring them down a notch.

Sketches and Gestures of Cartoons #1

Sorry that this is a day late.  My internet connection has been horrible and won't upload anything.  These are sketches from my sketchbook.  In my animation 3 class we watched the Tom and Jerry short, "Mouse in Manhattan," and the Mickey Mouse short, "Mickey's Symphony Hour."  Afterward, my teacher would pause certain parts for a minute or two and we would draw quick gestures of the characters.  I have been told in a comment that I should write more in my blog rather than relying purely on images and video to get my points across.  Therefore, for those of you who care to know more, I have written about the process behind creating these quick gestures below. jerrysketchesmickeysketches

Creating quick gestures of cartoons is very similar to creating ones of people  with a few noticeable differences.  One difference is that while the human pelvic area can be simplified into a cube, a cartoon's pelvic area is almost always spherical.  Also, while all people adhere to some general norms in terms of proportion, cartoons go by rules of their own.  It is much like drawing children in that you must first access how many heads tall the character is to aid in your drawing.  Probably the biggest difference between drawing live people and cartoons is that the poses of cartoons are exaggerated to extremes.  When drawing, it is easy to sometimes make the mistake of underestimating the amount of exaggeration taking place.  Drawing the line of action first helps aid in achieving the true stance of the pose.  Also, noticing the placement of the limbs in relationship with each other helps.  Hopefully I will get better and faster at doing these gestures as the year progresses.

Character Personality Walk Cycle

I've been meaning to post this, but lately I've been so busy that I hardly remember to breathe.  Well, now  finals are over and I am done with school for the semester.  Hopefully, I will be able to increase my posts over the summer.  I plan on returning to some of my traditional roots and doing more 3D sculpey work .  I also want to practice digital painting some more.

Character Design for Animation II

For my animation II class we were supposed to design a character that we can use throughout the semester for our assignments.  This way we would not have to waste time designing a new character before each assignment.  I came up with this simple design of a girl I call Susan.  I think that she will be fun to animate and I am exited to get started.susan_turn_aroundSusan_guide_emotions